World

Children’s noses ‘hold clues’ to serious lung infections

Child's noseImage copyright
Getty Images

Examining the bacteria and viruses in the noses of children could give clues to improve the diagnosis and treatment of severe lung infections, a new study has found.

Lung infections are a leading cause of death in under-fives worldwide.

The study found the make-up of bacteria and viruses was altered in the noses of children with respiratory infections.

Researchers say the study helps explain why some children are more prone to developing infections than others.

It could also be key to preventing serious lung infections.

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh found that the differences indicated the severity of the condition and could help doctors predict how long the child needs to stay in hospital.

They said that in less serious cases, it could reduce the need for antibiotics and help some children recover naturally.

‘Vital indicator’

Prof Debby Bogaert, of University of Edinburgh’s Medical Research Council Centre for Inflammation Research, who led the study, said: “Lung infections can be extremely serious in children and babies, and are very distressing for parents.

“Our findings show for the first time that the total microbial community in the respiratory tract – rather than a single virus or a bacteria – is a vital indicator of respiratory health.

“This could really impact on how doctors diagnose lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) and use precious antibiotics to fight infections.”

LRTIs include pneumonia and bronchiolitis.

University of Edinburgh researchers worked with teams in the Netherlands to take samples from more than 150 children under the age of six hospitalised with LRTIs. They then compared these with samples from 300 healthy children.

They found that the microbiome from the hospitalised children, the bacteria and viruses found in the back of the nose and throat, were related to that seen in the lungs, which made it easier to understand and diagnose the infection.

The study is published in the journal The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.

*This section only applies to third party rss feed users*
Kashmir Broadcasting Corporation allows the use of RSS Feeds, but with our content usage we expect that credit is given, but in the event that it is not. This content policy annotation will act as a credit towards KBC (Kashmir Broadcasting Corporation) Please visit kbcchannel.tv for more news and articles — we can not justify what is written on a third party site, as the content can be altered to their specification, if something is not authentic as it should be please visit kbcchannel.tv and look for the original content. if it is no longer there then it can no longer be associated with Kashmir Broadcasting Corporation and if the content on a third party site has been altered to the point of offence or deemed inappropriate please report it to KBC via email: report@kbcchannel.tv or fill the submission form on kbc’s website: https://www.kbcchannel.tv/report-form/ with the details of the site and article heading — Thank You

Website — https://www.kbcchannel.tv/
FaceBook — https://www.facebook.com/kbcchanneltv
Twitter — https://twitter.com/kbcchanneltv
YouTube — https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCV6TFLe3dGbavSYilnC2paQ
Instagram — https://www.instagram.com/kbcchanneltv/

Tags
Show More

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your e-mail address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button
Close

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker
%d bloggers like this: