Tech

The Resurrecting Creator Collection: House Women – A Black Feminist Anthology

Roaming the blogosphere as I am wont to do, I came across a challenge on calyx press’ blog. Of course, at 43, I do not qualify as a “young feminist” (if I ever did) but still it set me to thinking about my intentions to write a review of Home Girls: A Black Feminist Anthology.

To a young woman unanchored, on the verge of being culturally divorced from self, the anthology was one of a series of buoys clung to and devoured like I was a member of the Donner party – not the daughter of Salma. Comprising both poetry and prose, the book represents discussions black women were having with other black women – and society in general – about what it means to be a black woman. The scope of the conversation is wide-ranging. It includes the Combahee River Collective Statement which includes articulations such as

This focusing upon our own oppression is embodied in the concept of identity politics. We believe that the most profound and potentially most radical politics come directly out of our own identity, as opposed to working to end somebody else’s oppression. In the case of Black women this is a particularly repugnant, dangerous, threatening, and therefore revolutionary concept because it is obvious from looking at all the political movements that have preceded us that anyone is more worthy of liberation than ourselves. We reject pedestals, queenhood, and walking ten paces behind. To be recognized as human, levelly human, is enough.

I’m not entirely clear on the concept of identity politics. However, it does strike me as the essence of self-determination to push your own cause. In the case of black women, the cause should be black women. Home Girls is one of the spots along my literary read trail where I realized it was acceptable, revolutionary even, to come out from the background, open my mouth and express my full self.

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Home Girls is also where I first encountered the work of poet Kate Rushin. Her poem, the Black Back-ups,

is dedicated to Merry Clayton, Cissy Houston, Vonetta Washington, Dawn, Carrietta McClellen, Rosie Farmer, Marsha Jenkins and Carolyn Williams. This is for all of the Black women who sang back-up for Elvis Presley, John Denver, James Taylor, Lou Reed, Etc, Etc, Etc.

This is for Hattie McDaniels, Butterfly McQueen, Ethel Waters

Saphire

Saphronia

Ruby Begonia

Aunt Jemima

Aunt Jemima on the Pancake Box

Aunt Jemima on the Pancake Box?

AuntJemimaonthepancakebox?

auntjemimaonthepancakebox?

Ainchamamaonthepancakebox?

Aint chure Mama on the pancake box?

Mama Mama

Get offa that damn box

And come home to me

And my Mama leaps offa that box

She swoops down in her nurse’s cape

Which she wears on Sunday

And on Wednesday night prayer meeting

And she wipes my forehead

And she fans my face for me

And she makes me a cup o’ tea

And it don’t do a thing for my real pain

Except she is my Mama

Mama Mommy Mommy Mammy Mammy

Mam-mee Mam-mee

I’d Walk a mill-yon miles

For one o’ your smiles

This is for the Black Back-ups

This is for my mama and your mama

My grandma and your grandma

This is for the thousand thousand Black Back-ups

And the colored girls say*

After reading this poem, I couldn’t hear Lou Reed’s Walk on the Side as just a song. Instead, it now expressed a relationship where the talent and artistic skill of black women is used to enrich other artists – musically as well as economically. It’s Big Mama Thornton and Elvis played out all over the cultural landscape. Or would be – except that Big Mama’s daughter wants her mother and wrote a poem about it; a poem which changes the dynamic landscape of understanding.

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* © 1983 Donna Kate Rushin

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